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Thread: Why doesn't Meyer make a plow for my truck?

  1. #1
    Administrator admin's Avatar
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    Why doesn't Meyer make a plow for my truck?

    The #1 reason Meyer may not make a plow for a given vehicle is the vehicle's FAWR (Front Axle Weight Rating). The #2 reason is that the vehicle manufacturer strongly prohibits a plow on a given vehicle, or that the vehicle manufacturer put accessories, or the radiator, condenser, or other things in the way of where a plow frame would be attached to the vehicle. The vehicle itself may be a uni-body construction and not even have a real chassis (frame).

    A prime example of things in the way is the Jeep Grand Cherokee. A prime example of uni-body is the Ford Explorer. Meyer used to offer the Drive Pro for the Ford Explorer, but in 2010 Ford switched to uni-body, and I am sure they lightened the FAWR as well.

    SUV's in general are a tough vehicle to get a plow on because what most people fail to realize is ANY weight in front of the rear axle, puts that load on the front axle too. This is why any ballast weight in the rear of a plow truck is said to be secured "30" behind the center of the rear axle". Basically if you are trying to take weight off the front axle then you want the weight against the tailgate of the vehicle. So all of you who put a load in the bed for ballast, yes, it is ballast, and will help with traction, it will not however take any load off the front axle, rather, it will add to the load on the front. This is why SUV's are tough, all that extra sheet metal and glass are on the front axle as well, so there is little reserve capacity for a plow.

    Can you ignore this and "just do it anyway" of course you can, and then you can also accept any liability in the event of an accident that can be traced back to brake failure, or a handling problem caused by overloading the front axle yourself. NO plow manufacturer is going to expose themselves to that liability, or put the public in harns way just so you can put a plow on a vehicle that cannot truly handle a plow safely.

    We have all seen overloaded pickups with way too much weight in the rear. People install air bags to help handle the weight, but what air bags can't do is upgrade the brakes for the additional load. Beginning in the mid 1980's brake systems started having a weight rating. Two 3/4 ton 2500 model trucks could have drastically different brake weight ratings, yet both are considered 3/4 ton trucks.

    So is installing plows and plowing rocket science? No, but there is more to it than most people ever consider.

    Beginning with the 2011 model year, Ford switched to electric power steering on the F-150. They released a Service Bulletin (Q-200R1)forbidding plow installs on the F-150. Beginning with the 2015 model year, they are finally offering plow prep on the F-150 again, however, there is a button on the dash marked Snow Plow that must be turned on to kill various accessories to free up power to operate the plow.

    In 2014, GM and Dodge also followed suit on the 1500 models switching to electric power steering. Dodge does NOT offer a plow prep package on the 1500. GM does offer a plow prep package on the 1500 however, read the fine print, it is only available on standard cab, standard bed configurations, period. It is rare these days to find a standard cab truck on a dealer lot, and all dealers push what they have sitting on the lot, so buyer beware.

    Another trend that started around 2010 is the front end of 1500 model trucks got lower. This is why you often hear about "leveling kits" meant to raise the front end up to where it should be. One of the reasons for this is to increase fuel mileage, just like the electric power steering. The government has set mileage standards for trucks, and the 1500 are considered cars, so the standards are higher than 3/4 ton trucks. Beginning with the 2020 model year, 3/4 ton and up trucks also will have to comply with new standards. This is why Ford has gone to aluminum body panels on the F-150, and even a "proprietary aluminum alloy" for the truck frames. This is also why every GM commercial now touts they are made from "high strength steel" to rub it in Fords face.

    In my opinion as of today, the best personal use "I want to put a plow on it to plow my driveway and a couple of others" would be the Toyota Tacoma, or the Jeep Wrangler. Both are very agile in tight spaces, and have many creature comforts, and are more than capable of handling a small personal use plow. Meyer makes the Drive Pro 6' 8" for 2005 - 2015 Tacoma, and for 1997 - 2015 Jeep Wrangler.

    -Admin

  2. #2
    Administrator admin's Avatar
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    Working on a Meyer Plow in NJ
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    Now, although I might turn away specific vehicles for plow installs, there are PLENTY of places that simply do not care, and want to make the sale, so they will sell you a plow and install it on any vehicle that a mount is made for. It does not matter what brand, if a plow mount is made, there is someone that will sell it and install it no matter what. I was made aware of the 2010 Ram 1500 first, I spoke to a dealer out of State that called here asking how we got around the low front ride height. His shop installed 4 plows on 4 trucks and had to remove them because the plows sat so low on the truck when the plow was raised. The plows were bottoming out just turning into parking lots. Another customer had the local Dodge dealer install a plow on his Ram 1500, and then took it back and had them remove it for the same reason. Isn't it ironic that Chrysler even sells a leveling kit for the Ram 1500 as an accessory?

    I could put a plow on damn near anything with wheels, BUT if the mount is all fabricated by my shop, then 100% of the liability is on me. So it is my choice to not do so. Remember many shops do not have YOUR best interest in mind when selling you ANYTHING. By the same token, they will sell you anything you ask for, just to make the sale. Educate yourself, do not put yourself in a liable situation, because yes, you will be named in any lawsuits as well as the shop. Especially when the vehicle manufacturer explicitly states not to put a plow on a given vehicle.

    Just because you want to do it, and someone wants to get paid to make it work, does not mean it is a smart choice on your part. BE SMART.

    ~Admin

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